2439
19 Apr 14 at 1 am

Native American Proverb (via presidentobarna)

(via aanjikwag-deactivated20140420)

"White people will believe anything if they think it’s a Native American proverb."

agenttdunham:

  • fetuses do not think
  • they do not “scream out” when they are aborted
  • they have no brain function and no nerve endings until long after the deadline for a legal abortion
  • they aren’t “sad” when you abort them
  • they do not “realize what is happening”

And these aren’t my beliefs, they’re scientific facts

(via aanjikwag-deactivated20140420)

flixes:

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 193292
18 Apr 14 at 1 am

(Source: fgt666, via reu625)

 233527
18 Apr 14 at 1 am

me as a professional therapist  (via losergirlfriend)

(via reu625)

"aw that sucks :("

 4884
18 Apr 14 at 1 am

R. Schuller (via breeezy)

(Source: elriz, via baapi-makwa)

"Never cut a tree down in the wintertime. Never make a negative decision in the low time. Never make your most important decisions when you are in your worst moods. Wait. Be patient. The storm will pass. The spring will come."

Had a lady come in right as we closed freaking out that we didn’t have soup or ham bones
So we gave her our number to call and ask when we would have soup bones which we do with every customer
She proceeded to flip out MORE and say “Don’t act like you’re doing me a favor, you get paid for this. Your company advertises soup and you should have it.”
And her boyfriend was there not saying anything and he looked like a broken down man
If you act like this to people in the service industry without a real reason for doing so you are the worst kind of person
Jesus didn’t die for this

 15269
17 Apr 14 at 9 am

Coco Fusco on her Amerindians piece from 1992 with Guillermo Gómez-Peña (via tofunkey)

(via feministwerewolf)

"What is interesting, is that the Frida Kahlo venerated by American feminists is a very different Frida Kahlo to the one people learn about in Mexico, in the Chicano community. In her country, she is recognized as an important artist and a key figure in revolutionary politics of early 20th century Mexico. Her communist affiliations are made very clear. Her relationship with Trotsky is underscored. All her political activities with Diego Rivera are constantly emphasized. The connection between her art and her politics is always made. When Chicana artists became interested in Frida Kahlo in the ‘70s and started organizing homages, they made the connection between her artistic project and theirs because they too were searching for an aesthetic compliment to a political view that was radical and emancipatory. But when the Euro-American feminists latch onto Frida Kahlo in the early ‘80s and when the American mainstream caught on to her, she was transformed into a figure of suffering. I am very critical of that form of appropriation."